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A Very Arc-ish Readathon: Announcement & TBR

a very arcish readathon

(Feel free to use this graphic in your posts!)

Hello, everyone! Today, I come to you with an announcement for a readathon that I’ll be hosting in April. Us bloggers have the privilege of getting our hands on ARCs – whether those are physical ARCs or digital ARCs through Netgalley and Edelweiss and such. And sometimes, we go overboard and request too many at the same time, or sometimes life gets in the way, throwing off our reading schedules and we fall behind on all those ARCs that we need to get to. I’m way behind on the review copies that I need to read – my ratio is falling behind, and I really need to get my shit together. I thought that I’d spend the month of April clearing out my shelf – and then I thought, why not get others to join in?

W H E N

The readathon runs from 12:01 AM (your time) on April 1st to April 30th, 11:59 PM (your time).

G O A L S  A N D  C H A L L E N G E S

This is a low-pressure, low-key readathon, and so it doesn’t really have any challenges. The only goal is to read as many ARCs as possible; if you’re feeling ambitious, and are trying to catch up on your 80% ratio goal on Netgalley, aim for that. If your goal (like mine) is to just read as many ARCs as possible, and hopefully read everything on your shelf, you can do that. Take it easy – I know reviewing and blogging can be stressful as it is; you don’t need to add more pressure on yourself by adding unnecessary challenges.

H A S H T A G

I’ll be tracking my progress on social media, specifically Twitter, using the hashtag #AVAReadathon. You can join the conversation by using that hashtag; it’ll be fun to engage with other users more readily!

G I V E A W A Y

At the end of the month, I will randomly pick two winners who will both win a pre-order of a book of their choice. This can be a pre-order of an ARC you read and really enjoyed, or it can be anything else – as long as it’s a pre-order. The giveaway is open internationally (as long as The Book Depository ships to you), and if you’re an international participant to whom TBD does not ship, you will be able to choose an eBook pre-order that will be gifted to you.

H O W  T O  E N T E R

You must put up a post on your blog (or Instagram, or Twitter, or Tumblr – literally just anywhere on the Internet) announcing the readathon, and if you’d like, make a TBR. You can link your posts in the linky at the end of this post. Please also link this post in your own posts so that other people who want to participate can easily find this information.

And that’s about it for what the readathon is and the prizes. If you’d like to know more, or have any questions, feel free to leave a comment on this post and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.


W H A T  I ‘ L L  B E  R E A D I N G

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A D D  Y O U R  L I N K S

#DiversityDecBingo TBR


The Readathon Event


Hey, all. So, if you don’t follow me on Twitter (psst, you should), you might not know that a few friends and I are hosting a diversity readathon event in the month of December. Called the ‘Diversity December Bingo,’ it’s a team-venture that runs from December 1st – December 31st, 2016. It’ll be a month full of diverse reads where you can read books written by marginalized authors, or books about characters belonging to marginalized groups, and maybe win a prize while you do so.

So this is how it works. From the 25 squares below, you choose one line – this line can be horizontal, vertical or diagonal. You read one book from each category in the line you’ve chosen, and once you finish your 5-book challenge, you’re entered into a giveaway. More details on the giveaway will be coming up soon (follow Twitter for more updates, or simply track the #DiversityDecBingo hashtag!)

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If you decide to join, leave a comment down below with a link to a TBR post, tweet or Instagram post, and I’ll add your name to this post so people can come find you. Also, you can use the #DiversityDecBingo hashtag on social media to keep track of others who are participating, come up with some ideas for your own TBR and keep up with all the awesome diverse books out there.


My TBR


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I chose this particular line because I have not read nearly enough books with any of these aspects; I have yet to read a book with a main character who is a native. I’m ashamed to say that I have had abysmal exposure to f/f relationships in YA. I’ve read only two books in the past with biracial main characters, no books with neurodiversity, and just one book with an asexual character. Because all of the books below are already on my TBR, I thought this would be the perfect line to finally get to these books:


With that, I’ll end this post. I hope you consider joining me in my very first hosting adventure, especially because it’s something I’m super passionate about. The other ladies who are hosting this with me are all inspirational and wonderful, so come say hi on Twitter (or here). If this goes really well, we’re hoping to do a bi-annual or annual event where we can get together and read diversely more and more. <3


Participants’ TBRs

BiblioNyan | 4thHouseontheLeft | What the Log Had to Say | Sprinked Pages


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Top Ten Tuesday | Books I've Added to My TBR List Lately

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Hello everyone! It’s that time of the week again! Top Ten Tuesday is a book meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Basically, you get a different bookish topic every Tuesday, and you comprise a list of ten (or however many you’re able to list) relating to said topic.

This week’s topic is hard, but it shouldn’t be, considering I add 10 books to my Goodreads TBR every single day. Which is where the difficulty lies because how in the world am I supposed to narrow down my TBR to 10 books?! So, here are ten books I recently became aware of that have been getting great reviews and which I’m most excited to get to.


2606811510. The Yoga of Max’s Discontent by Karan Bajaj

The Yoga of Max’s Discontent follows the story of Max Psoraz, a child of Greek immigrants who grew up in New York, became hella successful on Wall Street and became the poster child for the American Dream. When he’s involved in a violent incident one night, Max begins to question his life, and contemplates the meaning of life, death, suffering and mortality. His questions lead him all the way to India where he’s forced to confront the basest aspects of humanity and discover the meaning of life.

Okay, so I know this book sounds like that stereotypical white-person-goes-to-India-and-discovers-himself book, a trope I’m very much against. But this book has incredible reviews from Indian people, and it’s an Own Voices book, meaning it’s written by an Indian. I’m very curious to see how the subject and trope is tackled. Oh, and that cover. *drools*


Goodreads | Amazon

189523419. The Grace of Kings (The Dandelion Dynasty #1) by Ken Liu

The Grace of Kings is a fantasy book that has crossed my path several times the past few months, and I don’t think I’ve heard a single negative thing about it. Written by a Chinese-American author, this massive novel follows the story of two guys, both fearless and colorful within their own right, who become best friends and fellow-rebels after a series of adventures against armies and gods. They join forces to overthrow the emperor of their kingdom, but once their task has been achieved, they find themselves leaders of opposing factions and end up becoming rivals.

This fantasy series sounds incredible, and one that is driven primarily with its complex characters. If you know anything about me, you’ll know that I love myself a good character dynamic. From what I’ve heard, The Grace of Kings has intimate political intrigue, complex plot and fantastic world-building. I’m excited to get to it!


Goodreads | Amazon

158190288. The Golem and the Jinni (The Golem and the Jinni #1) by Helene Wecker

This book follows the story of two (semi?)supernatural beings who are thrown into an unfamiliar surrounding, forced to rely on each other as friends to get through hardship. Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, who was brought to life by a rabbi dealing with black magic. Circumstances lead to her guardian dying, and she finds herself in New York City. Ahmad is a jinn, born in a Syrian desert. When he is accidentally released from a copper flask in a Lower Manhattan store, Ahmad finds that even though he is free, he’s still bound to the world.

This is, by no means, a new book. When it was first released in 2013, I wasn’t interested because it’s freaking massive and I’m not into historical fiction. But when I learned that it was about two supernatural creatures from two religious mythologies that are often so up-in-arms with each other, I was sold.


Goodreads | Amazon

249565287. The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet follows the stories of three different people – a Martian woman who’s looking for an escape from the life she’s leaving behind, a pilot who’s navigating space without any of her own kind, and a captain who’s waiting for a loved one at war. But even though three primary stories are at play, the book weaves together the adventures of nine different characters, from various cultures and backgrounds in a futuristic society where our extraordinary is the norm.

This is another book I’ve been aware of for a long time, but it didn’t come to my attention until I saw a glowing review from one of my favorite Booktubers (MercysBookishMusings), who is generally a harsh critic. The only other book I’ve read that can be categorized as a space opera is Illuminae, but this one sounds so much more appealing to me than Illuminae ever did.


Goodreads | Amazon

204562226. For Today I Am a Boy by Kim Fu

When Peter Huang was born, Peter was given the Chinese name “juan chaun,” powerful king. The only son in the middle of three daughters, Peter’s been given the burden of certain expectations- Peter will embody the dreams of Peter’s father, embody the ideals of masculinity and power. But Peter doesn’t have those dreams; because Peter is a girl, and there’s no question about it.

This is completely CW’s fault- whenever she talks about this book, I bump it up my TBR because it sounds incredible. I haven’t read many books with trans protagonists in the first place, but a book with a Chinese trans woman as the main character? It sounds poignant and profound, and I’ve heard that it’s sensitive, witty, and I can’t wait to get to it.


Goodreads | Amazon

59973365. Burnt Shadows by Kamila Shamsie

Burnt Shadows is the tale of one woman’s tumultuous life as she is transported from place to place, culture to culture in a world torn apart by hatred and war. Starting in Nagasaki, Hiroko Tanaka is a twenty-one year old woman betrothed to a man, living a decent enough life. When the atomic bomb destroys life as she knows it, Hiroko moves to India to start over, to escape the horrors she’s experienced in her life. But she arrives in Delhi in the middle of the Pakistan-India Partition, and she finds herself in yet another war-torn country.

As a Pakistani, I have never read a book about the India-Pakistan partition- I’m such a joke. I think it’s such a pivotal moment in world history, often overlooked for whatever reason. The fact that the protagonist is a Japanese immigrant to Pakistan just makes me so excited to give it a go.


Goodreads | Amazon

178692124. Promise of Shadows by Justina Ireland Stone

This is a really hard book to summarize, so I’m just going to use the Goodreads description: “Zephyr Mourning has never been very good at being a Harpy. She’d rather watch reality TV than learn forty-seven ways to kill a man, and she pretty much sucks at wielding magic. Zephyr was ready for a future pretending to be a normal human instead of a half-god assassin. But all that changes when her sister is murdered—and she uses a forbidden dark power to save herself from the same fate.

Zephyr is on the run from a punishment worse than death when an unexpected reunion with a childhood friend (a surprisingly HOT friend) changes everything. Because it seems like Zephyr might just be the Nyx, a dark goddess made flesh that is prophesied to change the power balance. For hundreds of years the half-gods have lived in fear, and Zephyr is supposed to change that.”

Justina Ireland Stone is one of the most vocal advocates of social justice on Twitter, and I’ve been aware of her for a very long time, but I’ve never read any of her books. I’ve heard good things about this, so I’ll start over here. 🙂


Goodreads | Amazon

254890253. The Vegetarian by Han Kang

The Vegetarian is a semi-horror, psychological thriller about a woman named Yeong-hye whose perfect life with her wonderful husband is disrupted when the nightmares begin. The dreams present her with vulgar images of brutality and torture, and Yeong-hye is so turned off by it all that she vows to never eat meat again. The small act of independence sets in motion a pushback from her family, and as Yeong-hye defends her decision so adamantly, she spirals into an estranged, dangerous state.

I’ve heard mixed reviews about this one, but nothing I’ve heard has quite diminished my interest. It sounds like a fascinating commentary on our concept of self and the personal choices we make, for whatever reason. I’ve recently been really enjoy thrillers as well, so I’m looking forward to giving this a go.


Goodreads | Amazon

248858322. The Death and Life of Zebulon Finch by Daniel Kraus

This series follows the story of a seventeen year old gangster named Zebulon Finch, who is gunned down and murdered on the shores of Lake Michigan in 1896. Then, he is mysteriously resurrected. Zebulon’s second life is completely different from his first; he finds himself constantly under scientific inspection. He is prodded and probed by a scientist obsessed with death. Zebulon escapes and begins an adventure, running through North America, discovering the meaning of love and loss- hoping that he’ll one day find redemption for everything he did in his past life.

I’ve heard nothing about this book. When I was perusing the shelves at The Strand Bookstore, I found this on one of the tables and it immediately called out to me. It sounds freaking incredible, and I love me a morally ambiguous protagonist. Hopefully, I’ll enjoy this- and hopefully, more people will pick it up.


Goodreads | Amazon

270714901. Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Homegoing begins when two half-sisters from Ghana are torn apart; one is sold into slavery, the other is married off to a British slaver. The latter lives in an extravagant palace, with all the luxuries she can afford, but little does she know that her sister is entrapped and slaving away in a dungeon below where she breathes, eats and lives. I believe that Homegoing is a generational story in that it follows the stories of many different families and characters over the course of two continents and three centuries of history- from the plantations in the South to the Civil War to the coal mines in Alabama.

Recently, this book has been the talk of the town. Some of my most trusted bloggers have read and raved about it- calling it their best read of the year. From the synopsis, I can already tell that it’s going to be a heartbreaking tale of family, love and loss. It’s also an Own Voices novel, which excites me so much.


Goodreads | Amazon

That’s it for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday! Have you read any of these books? What are some of your latest TBR additions? Let me know in the comments below; as always, thanks for stopping by and happy reading! 🙂

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Top Ten Tuesday | Books on my Fall '16 TBR

Top Ten Tuesday Photo Banner


Hello everyone! It’s that time of the week again! Top Ten Tuesday is a book meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Basically, you get a different bookish topic every Tuesday, and you comprise a list of ten (or however many you’re able to list) relating to said topic.

This week’s topic is “Ten books on your Fall TBR.” Now this time of the year is both elating and devastating- elating because so. many. good. books, devastating – well, mainly for my bank account. And because there are simply so many books I want to get to this season, here are just a few that are top-priority. Since I tend to read more fantasy and paranormal than anything else in the fall, winter months, this list will be heavy with those genres. So, let’s get into it!


Crooked Kingdom (The Dregs #2) by Leigh Bardugo

Is this a surprise? It really shouldn’t be. Crooked Kingdom is my most anticipated release of the year; Six of Crows was one of my favorite books of last year, and I’m so excited to touch base with these characters, dive back into the world. Fully prepared for it to break me, though.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Girl from Everywhere by Heidi Heilig

This is (most probably) the October pick for the new Keep It Diverse Book Club that a few friends and I created. I’ve heard fantastic things about this book, so I’m super excited to get into it. This is one I will definitely be getting to in October.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Devourers by Indra Das

Mostly a cover-buy, but the fact that it revolves around South Asian/Indian mythology was also a selling-point. I recently listened to a podcast with the author, and he sounded like such an intelligent, lovely guy. After listening to the podcast, I bumped it up near the top of my TBR!


Goodreads | Amazon

The Young Elites by Marie Lu

I probably (morally speaking) should read Legend before I read The Young Elites, but TYE just sounds so much more appealing? The protagonist is not a hero! Books like that are automatic loves for me. With the last book coming out very soon, this series is just pulling me in!


Goodreads | Amazon

Fire Boy by Sami Shah

I might already have finished this book by the time this post goes live (I’m scheduling ahead, wow I can’t believe I’m actually being productive), but I’m so excited to be reading this book! It’s set in the urban capital of Pakistan (Karachi) and is a genre fiction horror/fantasy/paranormal about djinn and the creepiest creatures in South Asian mythology. The author is a prominent Pakistani comedian, and I genuinely love his work. Already started reading this, and I’m terrified but loving every second of it!


Goodreads | Amazon

Iron Cast by Destiny Soria

I have an e-galley of this book, and I’m super excited to get to it (I’ve been saying this about all the books in this post, haven’t I?) I’ve heard really great things about this book, and I know that it’s a diverse read- bonus points!


Goodreads | Amazon

This Is Our Story by Ashley Elston

Again, not gonna lie- this was a cover-discovery. I came across the cover on Netgalley and I knew I had to request it. So glad my request was granted; I love thrillers, and this book has great ratings on Goodreads so far! Will be reading it around Halloween, hopefully.


Goodreads | Amazon

Heartless by Marissa Meyer

I was a little late to the Lunar Chronicles party- I started reading after Cress had been released, but I grew to really enjoy that series. I’ve only ever read one Alice in Wonderland retelling (Splintered), and I despised it- hopefully, this one is better. I trust Marissa Meyer to give me a cohesive, entertaining story!


Goodreads | Amazon

Legacy of Kings by Eleanor Herman

This is another one I’ve heard really great things about. It also fulfills one of the categories in the Fall Book Bingo challenge, so that’s a plus. I also know that the author is a historian, and she mixes a ton of fantasy and history together to make for a compelling read. Hopefully I’ll be able to read the first two books in the series before the third comes out next year.


Goodreads | Amazon

Tell the Truth, Shame the Devil by Melina Marchetta

I’ve only read Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta, but I remember loving it. It was profound- beautifully written and so, so heartbreaking. I plan on reading Finnikin of the Rock soon too, but I’ve got my eyes set firmly on this one. I’ve heard it has a ton of representation too!


Goodreads | Amazon

That’s it for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday! Have you read any of these books, or plan on reading them in the fall too? Let me know in the comments below; as always, thanks for stopping by and happy reading! 🙂

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Fall Book Bingo '16 TBR

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Hey, everyone! Today, I come to you with yet another TBR (because the past few weren’t epic fails, right?) I’ve seen this Book Bingo thing around for a couple of months now, but I haven’t participated in one yet. Since school and work have started, I’d like to organize and orient myself so I can get more reading done, especially since the workload is just going to keep growing and growing until I explode.

This season-ly Book Bingo reading challenge is hosted at Pretty Deadly Blog. I think it’s a wonderful idea, especially since the reading categories are pretty open-ended, and give you some room to wiggle around. I did edit some categories (only two, I think) to suit my reading preferences, and I’ll tell you which ones as we go along. The Fall Book Bingo reading challenge runs from September – December, and since I’ve already read two books in the month of September, I’ll be counting those in this.

Obviously, my mood varies greatly and so does my reading. This is just a tentative TBR of books that I do plan on getting to soon, but don’t hold me to it. 😀


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Stand AloneDark Matter by Blake Crouch (Buy on Amazon)

Animal on the Cover: The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson (Buy on Amazon)

Purple Cover: And I Darken by Kiersten White (Buy on Amazon)

DragonsTalon by Julie Kagawa (Buy on Amazon)

Fall Release: Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo (Buy on Amazon)


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Back List: Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk (Buy on Amazon)

Sea Creatures: Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama (Buy on Amazon)

Horror or Paranormal: The Girl with All the Gifts by M. R. Carey (Buy on Amazon)

Friendship: Beauty Queens by Libba Bray (Buy on Amazon)

Creepy Cover: The Devil of Nanking by Mo Hayder (Buy on Amazon)


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Multi P.O.V: The Young Elites by Marie Lu (Buy on Amazon)

Green Cover: The Female of the Species by Mindy McGinnis (Buy on Amazon)

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Retelling: Heartless by Marissa Meyer (Buy on Amazon)

Short Story: The Good Immigrant edited by Nikhesh Shukla (essay collection) (Buy on Amazon)


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Killers: Saving Sophie by Sam Carrington (Buy on Amazon)

Revenge: Burn for Burn by Jenny Han (Buy on Amazon)

Illustrated: Harry Potter & the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling (re-read) (Buy on Amazon)

Black Cover: Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake (Buy on Amazon)

LGBTQ (edited category): Just Juliet by Charlotte Reagan (Buy on Amazon)


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Suspense: Dark Places by Gillian Flynn (Buy on Amazon)

Recommended to Me: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (Buy on Amazon)

Not Set in the USA (edited category): The Devourers by Indra Das (Buy on Amazon)

Weapon on the Cover: Legacy of Kings by Eleanor Harman (Buy on Amazon)

College: The Secret History by Donna Tartt (re-read) (Buy on Amazon)


Well, that’s it for this TBR. I’m very excited to be participating in this Book Bingo! Are you taking part? Have you read any of these? Let me know in the comments, and as always, thanks for stopping by and happy reading!

Top Ten Tuesday | Books on my TBR since Before I Started Blogging

Top Ten Tuesday Photo Banner


Hello everyone! It’s that time of the week again! Top Ten Tuesday is a book meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Basically, you get a different bookish topic every Tuesday, and you comprise a list of ten (or however many you’re able to list) relating to said topic.

This week’s topic is “Ten Books that Have Been on Your TBR Since Before You Started Blogging.” I’ve been blogging for over a year and a half now, and I’m ashamed at how many books I have on my Goodreads to-read shelf that I still haven’t read. Granted, I’ve managed to get some of them off my shelf this year, but I still have way too many.


Tess of the D’urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

I think Thomas Hardy is my favorite classics’ author, not that I have read many but still. I’ve read two books by him: Far From the Madding Crowd and The Mayor of Casterbridge. Tess is perhaps his most famous ones, and it’s been on my shelf for a good three years now. I can’t believe I still haven’t gotten to it but perhaps this year will be it.


Goodreads | Amazon

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

I’ve read The Kite Runner by Hosseini, and it’s a book that has stuck with me ever since I read it many, many years ago. Hosseini has since released two other books, both of which have gotten high praise. I’ve been eyeballing them for so long!


Goodreads | Amazon

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Honestly, this book ended up on my TBR when I was working at Barnes & Noble and I saw its new, bright red cover and fell in love with it. Then when I read the blurb and realized that it’s a modern classic – I knew I had to read it. And I do, but I still haven’t. >.>


Goodreads | Amazon

My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult

Another author whose work I have read and enjoyed. Nineteen Minutes is most definitely my favorite book on school shootings, and I know Picoult can handle sensitive, heart-breaking topics with poise. But I know this book is a hard one to digest, so I still haven’t gotten to it. Hopefully soon…


Goodreads | Amazon

The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling

I bought this book the day it was released. Started reading the first chapter, was so shocked by the drastic shift in writing from the Harry Potter series that I stopped. Never picked it up again. But ever since I’ve read and LOVED The Cormoran Strike series, I think I’ll give this one a go.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

I’ve tried reading this a few times, but I think I was too young to fully appreciate the vivid world-building. I love the movies – they’re some of my favorites of all-time, and I’m certain that I’ll love the books too. I just need to gather the courage and give them another chance.


Goodreads | Amazon

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple

Honestly, this book made it onto my TBR because it has a sick cover. Added bonus that it was all anyone was talking about in late 2013, or early 2014.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Child Thief by Brom

This book is about an evil Peter Pan who steals boys. It sounds freaking awesome, and it has illustrations and is a favorite among fantasy-lovers. I’ve been interested in this for a long time, but I made the mistake of reading another book by the same author- and I wasn’t crazy about it. Which is why I’ve been putting off reading this. But I do plan on picking it up!


Goodreads | Amazon

The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken

Finished series are such a commitment. Something tells me I should read Passenger by Bracken before this one, but then I think that I already own a copy of the first book, and if I dislike Passenger, I won’t want to read it. It’s all very messy. #FirstWorldProblems


Goodreads | Amazon

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

Palahniuk’s books have some of the most interesting covers, which I realized when I used to shelve them while working at B&N. But Fight Club is the only one that’s really pulled me in, and since everyone I trust loves either the book or the movie, I need to get to it like yesterday.


Goodreads | Amazon

That’s it for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday! Have you read any of these books? What did you think of them? Let me know in the comments below; as always, thanks for stopping by and happy reading! 🙂

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#ReadThemAllThon TBR

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Hello, everyone! Today, I’m coming to you with another readathon TBR. As a new semester of university draws closer, I’d like to knock many books off my TBR as is possible.

The Pokémon Indigo League Read-a-thon is hosted by the lovely Aentee @ Read at Midnight. The read-a-thon takes place from August 14th to September 4th, and your goal is to read 8 books to ‘earn’ 8 Pokémon-themed badges. Aentee has a ton of fun bonuses that make the read-a-thon all the more compelling, so do check out her sign up and information post to get all the details. I know I’m two days late- I hadn’t planned on participating, since I haven’t been reading much, but this readathon is too fun to pass up. Also, the hype has seriously sucked me in, ha.


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and i darkenAnd I Darken (The Conquerors Saga #1) by Kiersten White | 475 pages | Potential: +47CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “No one expects a princess to be brutal. And Lada Dragwlya likes it that way. Ever since she and her gentle younger brother, Radu, were wrenched from their homeland of Wallachia and abandoned by their father to be raised in the Ottoman courts, Lada has known that being ruthless is the key to survival. She and Radu are doomed to act as pawns in a vicious game, an unseen sword hovering over their every move. For the lineage that makes them special also makes them targets.

Lada despises the Ottomans and bides her time, planning her vengeance for the day when she can return to Wallachia and claim her birthright. Radu longs only for a place where he feels safe. And when they meet Mehmed, the defiant and lonely son of the sultan, Radu feels that he’s made a true friend—and Lada wonders if she’s finally found someone worthy of her passion. But Mehmed is heir to the very empire that Lada has sworn to fight against—and that Radu now considers home. Together, Lada, Radu, and Mehmed form a toxic triangle that strains the bonds of love and loyalty to the breaking point.”

Note:

This book has some crazy hype going for it, and ever since I heard that it has tons of political intrigue, I knew I had to pick it up. Books with complicated politics are some of my favorites, so I’m looking forward to this.


Goodreads | Amazon

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22822858A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara | 720 pages | Potential: +72CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they’re broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome—but that will define his life forever.”

Note:

I’m such a huge fan of dark, thought-provoking, heartbreaking stories, and I have heard from multiple people that this fits all those definitions perfectly. I’ll make sure I have a bunch of tissues on hand when I start this. Also, what a massive tome.


Goodreads | Amazon

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unexpected everythingThe Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson | 517 pages | Potential: +51CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “Andie had it all planned out. When you are a politician’s daughter who’s pretty much raised yourself, you learn everything can be planned or spun, or both. Especially your future. Important internship? Check. Amazing friends? Check. Guys? Check (as long as we’re talking no more than three weeks).

But that was before the scandal. Before having to be in the same house with her dad. Before walking an insane number of dogs. That was before Clark and those few months that might change her whole life. Because here’s the thing—if everything’s planned out, you can never find the unexpected. And where’s the fun in that?”

Note:

Just like with all of Morgan Matson’s books, the Unexpected Everything has been getting unprecedented levels of hype. I’ve enjoyed her other books in the past, but have yet to be blown away by them. But considering this book has strong familial relationships and a vanilla core, I’m interested to see what it has to offer.


Goodreads | Amazon

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eltyEverything Leads to You by Nina LaCour | 312 pages | Potential: +31CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “A wunderkind young set designer, Emi has already started to find her way in the competitive Hollywood film world.

Emi is a film buff and a true romantic, but her real-life relationships are a mess. She has desperately gone back to the same girl too many times to mention. But then a mysterious letter from a silver screen legend leads Emi to Ava. Ava is unlike anyone Emi has ever met. She has a tumultuous, not-so-glamorous past, and lives an unconventional life. She’s enigmatic…. She’s beautiful. And she is about to expand Emi’s understanding of family, acceptance, and true romance.”

Note:

I have been trying to diversify my reading lately, so I’m so glad that this category exists in this readathon. I’ve heard nothing but fantastic things about this book, and I don’t think I’ve read many books with F/F pairings. I’m excited!


Goodreads | Amazon

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The Rose and the DaggerThe Rose & the Dagger (The Wrath and the Dawn #2) by Renée Ahdieh | 416 pages | Potential: +41CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “In a land on the brink of war, Shahrzad is forced from the arms of her beloved husband, the Caliph of Khorasan. She once thought Khalid a monster—a merciless killer of wives, responsible for immeasurable heartache and pain—but as she unraveled his secrets, she found instead an extraordinary man and a love she could not deny. Still, a curse threatens to keep Shazi and Khalid apart forever.

Now she’s reunited with her family, who have found refuge in the desert, where a deadly force is gathering against Khalid—a force set on destroying his empire and commanded by Shazi’s spurned childhood sweetheart. Trapped between loyalties to those she loves, the only thing Shazi can do is act. Using the burgeoning magic within her as a guide, she strikes out on her own to end both this terrible curse and the brewing war once and for all. But to do it, she must evade enemies of her own to stay alive.”

Note:

Guys, I can’t believe I haven’t read this book yet. Honestly. I loved the Wrath & the Dawn, and I’ve just been putting this off for the longest freaking time. I’m glad I’ve made the decision to pick it up during this readathon! Khalid and Shazi’s romance is swooooon-worthy.


Goodreads | Amazon

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Beauty of DarknessThe Beauty of Darkness (The Remnant Chronicles #3) by Mary E. Pearson | 688 pages | Potential: +68CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “Lia and Rafe have escaped Venda and the path before them is winding and dangerous – what will happen now? This third and final book in The Remnant Chronicles is not to be missed.”

Note:

I’m surprised by just how much I’m excited to read this book. I thought the first book in the series was alright, but the second one definitely stepped it up a notch. The conclusion is freaking massive, and it’s been getting fantastic reviews! I can’t wait to read it – it might be the first book I pick up.


Goodreads | Amazon

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27833670Dark Matter by Blake Crouch | 342 pages | Potential: +34CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “Are you happy with your life?” Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason’s never met smiles down at him and says, “Welcome back, my friend.”

In this world he’s woken up to, Jason’s life is not the one he knows. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born. And Jason is not an ordinary college physics professor but a celebrated genius who has achieved something remarkable–something impossible.

Is it this world or the other that’s the dream? And even if the home he remembers is real, how can Jason possibly make it back to the family he loves? The answers lie in a journey more wondrous and horrifying than anything he could’ve imagined—one that will force him to confront the darkest parts of himself even as he battles a terrifying, seemingly unbeatable foe.

Note:

I have a copy of this book. I received it for free in exchange for an honest review, so I was already hoping to get to it this month. This readathon is the perfect opportunity to do so!


Goodreads | Amazon

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world afterWorld After (Penryn and the End of Days) by Susan Ee | 320 pages | Potential: +32CP

Goodreads Synopsis: “When a group of people capture Penryn’s sister Paige, thinking she’s a monster, the situation ends in a massacre. Paige disappears. Humans are terrified. Mom is heartbroken.

Penryn drives through the streets of San Francisco looking for Paige. Why are the streets so empty? Where is everybody? Her search leads her into the heart of the angels’ secret plans where she catches a glimpse of their motivations, and learns the horrifying extent to which the angels are willing to go.

Meanwhile, Raffe hunts for his wings. Without them, he can’t rejoin the angels, can’t take his rightful place as one of their leaders. When faced with recapturing his wings or helping Penryn survive, which will he choose?”


Goodreads | Amazon

Total Potential (including completed bonus): 536 


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Top Ten Tuesday | Ten Books Set in New York City

 

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Hello everyone! It’s that time of the week again! Top Ten Tuesday is a book meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Basically, you get a different bookish topic every Tuesday, and you comprise a list of ten (or however many you’re able to list) relating to said topic.

This week’s topic is “Ten books with X setting.” Since I live in New York City and am moving to Manhattan in a couple of weeks before my junior year starts, I thought I’d comprise a list of some of my favorite books set here, as well as some books that I really, really want to read. New York City is so diverse- people of all colors, faiths, ethnicities go about their day as one, cohesive ‘squad’ of sorts. From the vendors on the streets to the eclectic cuisine in both Manhattan and the surrounding boroughs. From people who wear palm leaves on the subway (I’ve seen this, I promise) to people who wear nothing at all (I have also seen this), this city is strange and wonderful.


Books I’ve Read


The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

This is the only required-reading book I’ve ever read that I actually enjoyed. The Great Gatsby was my first classic back when I read it in ninth grade, and I immediately fell in love with it. It was also my first exposure to New York City (granted, historical New York City) in literature-form, since I didn’t read much back then. But while I didn’t fully grasp the thematic, historical importance of the book when I first read it, I’ve grown to have a grudgingly strong admiration for Fitzgerald, his voice, his characters and his work.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

This may be cheating since a huge chunk of this book (and the worst chunk of it) is set in Las Vegas. But I read the Goldfinch when I had just moved to the city, and the atmosphere Tartt set was so authentic that it really helped me make my way as a newcomer. That sounds a little strange, mainly because the book is not meant to be helpful. But simply knowing little details about the Upper East Side and the East Village, how things work, what the people are like – it all helped me fit in.


Goodreads | Amazon

It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini

This is a funny sad book, which are some of my favorite books. Again, this is mostly set in a psychiatric facility rather than the city, but our main character is someone who was born and raised in upper Manhattan, I believe. People who have grown up in this bustling area have always fascinated me, so it was interesting to see his connection with the city, his quirk of forming maps in his head, his experiences as a native New Yorker.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Diviners and Lair of Dreams by Libba Bray

Honestly, both the Diviners and its sequel, Lair of Dreams offer up such a glaringly contrasting viewpoint of New York. Again, it’s set in the 1920s and the New York back then is so different from what it is now. At present, like I said, NYC is so diverse and eclectic. New Yorkers are quick and rude, but they are also cultured and so welcoming of new cultures and new ideas. Libba Bray’s New York is a city completely unknown to me, full of prejudice, racism and darkness. And it’s not a fictional New York, because this is what it used to be like. And while prejudice and racism are obviously very much a problem, it’s still interesting to see how far this city has come, and how far it still needs to go.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon

I’m actually incredibly proud of myself for having read this book. When I started it, it was extremely slow and Chabon’s writing style was so dense that I almost abandoned it. But I’m glad I stuck with it because it’s a book I recommend to everyone. It’s set in NYC in the 1940s, with the backdrop of the second World War raging in the background. Comic book artists, tragedy, friendship, love and loss- there’s so much to love in this book.


Goodreads | Amazon

Books on my TBR


American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

“Patrick Bateman is twenty-six and works on Wall Street; he is handsome, sophisticated, charming and intelligent. He is also a psychopath. Taking us to a head-on collision with America’s greatest dream – and its worst nightmare – “American Psycho” is a bleak, bitter, black comedy about a world we all recognize but do not wish to confront.”

Murderers, dark humor, and New York City? Sign me up. Also, I haven’t seen the movie yet. Is that unusual?


Goodreads | Amazon

The Fortress of Solitude by Jonathan Lethem

“From the funked-up, messed-up Brookyn of the 1970s to the present day, this stunning novel spans thirty years in the life of two best friends, Dylan and Mingus, their families and an entire neighbourhood. From their stories comes the history of soul music, of graffiti art, of comic books, of experimental film and ‘rock writing’. With a cast of more than a hundred characters and more than fifty speaking parts, this is a touching and intimate novel on an epic scale.”

“A hundred characters … fifty speaking parts.” Yikes, I’m drawn to it just for the sheer magnitude of this book. I’m also a sucker for bromances, so why not. Also, can you tell that I’m being drawn to an increasing number of adult/literary fiction?


Goodreads | Amazon

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

“Nine-year-old Oskar Schell is an inventor, amateur entomologist, Francophile, letter writer, pacifist, natural historian, percussionist, romantic, Great Explorer, jeweller, detective, vegan, and collector of butterflies. When his father is killed in the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Centre, Oskar sets out to solve the mystery of a key he discovers in his father’s closet. It is a search which leads him into the lives of strangers, through the five boroughs of New York, into history, to the bombings of Dresden and Hiroshima, and on an inward journey which brings him ever closer to some kind of peace.”


Goodreads | Amazon

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they’re broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome—but that will define his life forever.


Goodreads | Amazon

The Thousandth Floor by Katherine McGee

Welcome to Manhattan, 2118. A hundred years in the future, New York is a city of innovation and dreams. But people never change: everyone here wants something…and everyone has something to lose. Leda Cole’s flawless exterior belies a secret addiction—to a drug she never should have tried and a boy she never should have touched. Eris Dodd-Radson’s beautiful, carefree life falls to pieces when a heartbreaking betrayal tears her family apart. Rylin Myers’s job on one of the highest floors sweeps her into a world—and a romance—she never imagined…but will her new life cost Rylin her old one? Watt Bakradi is a tech genius with a secret: he knows everything about everyone. But when he’s hired to spy by an upper-floor girl, he finds himself caught up in a complicated web of lies. And living above everyone else on the thousandth floor is Avery Fuller, the girl genetically designed to be perfect. The girl who seems to have it all—yet is tormented by the one thing she can never have.


Goodreads | Amazon

That’s it for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday! Have you read any of these books? What did you think of them? Do you have any recommendations set in New York City? Let me know in the comments below; as always, thanks for stopping by and happy reading! 🙂

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ARC August TBR

Hello everyone! Today, I thought I would bring to you my ARC August TBR. ARC August is an annual event held by Octavia and Shelly @ Read Sleep Repeat. The sign ups have closed, unfortunately, and I wasn’t in time to add my name/blog to the linky, but I’ll be participating anyway! 🙂

I’m not a huge follower of monthly TBRs, because I’m a big mood-reader. I can never say for certain what I will be reading during the entire month. But ARCs have deadlines, and I’ve been so good recently about keeping up with these deadlines, and I also have a couple of ARCs set to release in September, meaning I should probably get to them this month. This is a great way to let you guys know a tentative outline of some of the reading I’ll (hopefully) be getting done in August before school starts early September!


the gracesThe Graces by Laure Eve | Releases on September 3rd

“Everyone said the Graces were witches. They moved through the corridors like sleek fish, ripples in their wake. Stares followed their backs and their hair. They had friends, but they were just distractions. They were waiting for someone different. All I had to do was show them that person was me.

Like everyone else in her town, River is obsessed with the Graces, attracted by their glamour and apparent ability to weave magic. But are they really what they seem? And are they more dangerous than they let on?”


Goodreads | Amazon

28818317Every Falling Star by Sungju Lee | Releases on September 13th

“Every Falling Star, the first book to portray contemporary North Korea to a young audience, is the intense memoir of a North Korean boy named Sungju who is forced at age twelve to live on the streets and fend for himself. To survive, Sungju creates a gang and lives by thieving, fighting, begging, and stealing rides on cargo trains. Sungju richly re-creates his scabrous story, depicting what it was like for a boy alone to create a new family with his gang, his “brothers”; to be hungry and to fear arrest, imprisonment, and even execution. This riveting memoir allows young readers to learn about other cultures where freedoms they take for granted do not exist.”


Goodreads | Amazon

28363987The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride | Releases on September 20th

“Upon her arrival in London, an 18-year-old Irish girl begins anew as a drama student, with all the hopes of any young actress searching for the fame she’s always dreamed of. She struggles to fit in—she’s young and unexotic, a naive new girl—but soon she forges friendships and finds a place for herself in the big city.

Then she meets an attractive older man. He’s an established actor, 20 years older, and the inevitable clamorous relationship that ensues is one that will change her forever.

A redemptive, captivating story of passion and innocence set across the bedsits of mid-1990s London, McBride holds new love under her fierce gaze, giving us all a chance to remember what it’s like to fall hard for another.”


Goodreads | Amazon

25812109The Female of the Species by Mindy McGinnis | Releases on September 20th

“Alex Craft knows how to kill someone. And she doesn’t feel bad about it. When her older sister, Anna, was murdered three years ago and the killer walked free, Alex uncaged the language she knows best. The language of violence. While her crime goes unpunished, Alex knows she can’t be trusted among other people, even in her small hometown. She relegates herself to the shadows, a girl who goes unseen in plain sight, unremarkable in the high school hallways.

But Jack Fisher sees her. He’s the guy all other guys want to be: the star athlete gunning for valedictorian with the prom queen on his arm. Guilt over the role he played the night Anna’s body was discovered hasn’t let him forget Alex over the years, and now her green eyes amid a constellation of freckles have his attention. He doesn’t want to only see Alex Craft; he wants to know her.

So does Peekay, the preacher’s kid, a girl whose identity is entangled with her dad’s job, though that does not stop her from knowing the taste of beer or missing the touch of her ex-boyfriend. When Peekay and Alex start working together at the animal shelter, a friendship forms and Alex’s protective nature extends to more than just the dogs and cats they care for.

Circumstances bring Alex, Jack, and Peekay together as their senior year unfolds. While partying one night, Alex’s darker nature breaks out, setting the teens on a collision course that will change their lives forever.”


Goodreads | Amazon

27833670Dark Matter by Blake Crouch | Released on July 26th

““Are you happy with your life?” Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason’s never met smiles down at him and says, “Welcome back, my friend.”

In this world he’s woken up to, Jason’s life is not the one he knows. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born. And Jason is not an ordinary college physics professor but a celebrated genius who has achieved something remarkable–something impossible.

Is it this world or the other that’s the dream? And even if the home he remembers is real, how can Jason possibly make it back to the family he loves? The answers lie in a journey more wondrous and horrifying than anything he could’ve imagined—one that will force him to confront the darkest parts of himself even as he battles a terrifying, seemingly unbeatable foe.”


Goodreads | Amazon

Are you participating in ARC August? Even if you aren’t, tell me some of the ARCs you plan on getting to in August. As always, thanks for stopping by and happy reading!

#MakeMeRead | Readathon TBR

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The Make Me Read It Readathon runs from July 9th to July 16th, starting and ending at midnight wherever you are in the world. It is hosted by Val @ The Innocent Smiley, and Ely @ Tea and Titles. You can use the #MakeMeRead hashtag to interact with others taking part.

After much voting and back-and-forth between the several titles I listed in my Google survey, we now have a final TBR! These are all in order of highest to lowest votes:


Are you participating in this readathon? If so, what’s your TBR? Let me know in the comments below- and as always, happy reading! x

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